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Credit Reporting Information - What Can Be Reported?


What Will You Find on Your Credit Report
In general information will stay on your credit report for 7 years.   However, this does not mean that you will have a bad credit rating for seven years.  The sooner you start taking the steps to repair your credit the sooner you can begin to build a better credit rating.
  • Bankruptcy information can be reported for 10 years;
  • Information reported because of an application for a job with a salary of more than $75,000 has no time limitation;
  • Information reported because of an application for more than $150,000 worth of credit or life insurance has no time limitation;
  • Information concerning a lawsuit or a judgment against you can be reported for seven years or until the statute of limitations runs out, whichever is longer; and
  • Default information concerning U.S. Government insured or guaranteed student loans can be reported for seven years after certain guarantor actions.

The Credit Repair Organizations Act
By law, credit repair organizations must give you a copy of the "Consumer Credit File Rights Under State and Federal Law" before you sign a contract. They also must give you a written contract that spells out your rights and obligations. Read these documents before signing the contract. The law contains specific protections for you. For example, a credit repair company cannot:

  • make false claims about their services;
  • charge you until they have completed the promised services; or
  • perform any services until they have your signature on a written contract and have completed a three-day waiting period. During this time, you can cancel the contract without paying any fees.

Your contract must specify:

  • the payment terms for services, including their total cost;
  • a detailed description of the services to be performed;
  • how long it will take to achieve the results;
  • any guarantees they offer; and
  • the company's name and business address.

Have You Been Victimized?
Many states have laws strictly regulating credit repair companies. States may be helpful if you've lost money to credit repair scams.

If you've had a problem with a credit repair company, don't be embarrassed to report them. While you may fear that contacting the government will only make your problems worse, that's not true. Laws are in place to protect you. Contact your local consumer affairs office or your state attorney general (AG). Many AGs have toll-free consumer hotlines. Check with your local directory assistance.

Need Help? Don't Despair
Just because you have a poor credit report doesn't mean you won't be able to get credit. Creditors set their own credit-granting standards and not all of them look at your credit history the same way. Some may look only at more recent years to evaluate you for credit, and they may grant credit if your bill-paying history has improved. It may be worthwhile to contact creditors informally to discuss their credit standards.

If you can't resolve your credit problems yourself or you need additional help, you may want to contact a credit counseling service. There are non-profit organizations in every state that counsel consumers in debt. Counselors try to arrange repayment plans that are acceptable to you and your creditors. They also can help you set up a realistic budget. These counseling services are offered at little or no cost to consumers. You can find the office nearest you by checking the white pages of your telephone directory.

In addition, nonprofit counseling programs sometimes are operated by universities, military bases, credit unions, and housing authorities. They're also likely to charge little or nothing for their services. Or, you can check with your local bank or consumer protection office to see if it has a list of reputable, low-cost financial counseling services.

 

 

 
     
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2002 New York Debt Consolidation
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